• 66°

New water tank on mayor’s agenda

 

Several projects are on tap for the Town of Thorsby, including a possible 300,000-gallon water tank.
Mayor Dearl Hilyer says the town has reached capacity with its one water tank and may need a second, possibly in the south end of town, in order to serve a growing number of customers.
“We’re at capacity on our water tank right now,” Hilyer said. “We are required to have at least 24 hours worth of water in storage at all times.”
There are at least two reasons why the south end of town would be prime territory for a new tank. First, it could serve the Georgia-Pacific plant, the town’s biggest water customer aside from the city of Jemison.
Second, land for a future Thorsby elementary school has been set aside in that area of town, along Alabama Avenue (County Road 37).
Town leaders also wish to attract retail businesses, such as a department store or pharmacy. Hilyer said the town is currently collecting data to send to prospective businesses, such as Dollar General and Fred’s.
The data includes traffic counts along Highway 31, population estimates, rooftops in and near the town, and land availability.
“Land availability is a big thing,” Hilyer said. “I don’t have all the answers to these yet, but I’m working on them.”
He added that the town wants to find businesses that will complement, rather than hurt, the existing small businesses in Thorsby.
Among other items are repairs and upkeep to the town’s sewer system and the effort to preserve historical landmarks, such as the old Thorsby Elementary School.

Several projects are on tap for the Town of Thorsby, including a possible 300,000-gallon water tank.

Mayor Dearl Hilyer says the town has reached capacity with its one water tank and may need a second, possibly in the south end of town, in order to serve a growing number of customers.

“We’re at capacity on our water tank right now,” Hilyer said. “We are required to have at least 24 hours worth of water in storage at all times.”

There are at least two reasons why the south end of town would be prime territory for a new tank. First, it could serve the Georgia-Pacific plant, the town’s biggest water customer aside from the city of Jemison.

Second, land for a future Thorsby elementary school has been set aside in that area of town, along Alabama Avenue (County Road 37).

Town leaders also wish to attract retail businesses, such as a department store or pharmacy. Hilyer said the town is currently collecting data to send to prospective businesses, such as Dollar General and Fred’s.

The data includes traffic counts along Highway 31, population estimates, rooftops in and near the town, and land availability.

“Land availability is a big thing,” Hilyer said. “I don’t have all the answers to these yet, but I’m working on them.”

He added that the town wants to find businesses that will complement, rather than hurt, the existing small businesses in Thorsby.

Among other items are repairs and upkeep to the town’s sewer system and the effort to preserve historical landmarks, such as the old Thorsby Elementary School.