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Education in-service focuses on evolving teaching methods

Dana Smith, fifth grade teacher at Maplesville, signs her name on a canvas that read, "Chilton County Schools," "Together we will" and "Education forward," on Monday at the county school system's in-service.

Dana Smith, fifth grade teacher at Maplesville, signs her name on a canvas that read, “Chilton County Schools,” “Together we will” and “Education forward,” on Monday at the county school system’s in-service.

About 900 Chilton County educators gathered Monday for an “in-service” that focused on evolving methods of teaching students, according to Superintendent Tommy Glasscock.

Glasscock was sworn in as the county’s top education official on Dec. 28. He organized the in-service along with the host, the Education Workforce Development Council.

The event was held at the Clanton Conference and Performing Arts Center from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Jeff Herron with Alfa gave the invocation before Glasscock’s opening remarks.

Janice Hull, EWDC chairwoman, spoke, as did Sen. Cam Ward and Rep. Jimmy Martin.

Tommy Bice, Alabama superintendent of education, shared part of his Plan 2020 with those in attendance, which included teachers and administrators from each public school in the county.

“I think his message was very strong,” Glasscock said. “We’ve been given the opportunity to think outside the box. Kids don’t learn the way they used to.”

County Superintendent Tommy Glasscock (second from left) is shown with Jeff Herron of Alfa, state Superintendent Tommy Bice and Sen. Clyde Chambliss.

County Superintendent Tommy Glasscock (second from left) is shown with Jeff Herron of Alfa, state Superintendent Tommy Bice and Sen. Clyde Chambliss.

Other speakers included Elizabeth Huntley, associate with Lightfoot, Franklin and White, and a member of the Auburn University Board of Trustees; Guin Robinson with Jefferson State Community College; and Bill Naugher, owner and CEO of Crest Publishers who is also an author and educator.

Glasscock said a consistent theme for the speakers was the assessment of teaching methods.

“We just have to change the way we think,” he said. “I think that’s probably our first issue, is what we do with technology.”

After lunch provided by EWDC, which is housed under the Chilton County Chamber of Commerce, breakout sessions were held the rest of the afternoon.

Glasscock said the in-service was held at CPAC for the first time, the response was “overwhelming” and he plans to survey attendees about their experience.