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Getting students ready for work

Some of my funniest memories from high school are from the few vocational classes I took.

I didn’t take many, because I worked on the high school newspaper and took mostly electives that focused on writing or computers.

But I did take three or four classes, related to agriculture or the home economics course that every freshman took.

I remember particularly my welding course. I can’t say it’s a skill I use everyday, but man, it was cool then. You get kind of a Tim Allen- “Tool Time” feeling working with a blowtorch.

I’d say I was a modest welder, but I didn’t do too well in the carpentry class I took for a semester. While a few of my classmates were building multi-story doll houses, dog boxes fit for a king and other amazing creations, I’d venture a bluebird would rather battle the elements than risk its life in my bird box.

I also learned from Ms. Hicks’ class that I couldn’t sew. I don’t know what the P.C. name of the class was, but it was home economics. The only D I ever made on any assignment in high school was for an apron I made in her class — and she said that grade was generous.

My brothers took more tech classes than I did in subjects like auto repair, masonry and catfish farming (my hometown of Greensboro is the catfish capital of Alabama).

And I don’t think it’s any small surprise than one of my brothers has worked in both masonry and catfish farming.

Tech schools do a wonderful job preparing students for careers, with good starting salaries.

Inside today’s paper, you will find a special section on Chilton County’s LeCroy Career/Tech Center. Director Tommy Glasscock and everyone there has done a great job, and are expanding programs to prepare students for even more careers.

In one place, students can gets a jump start to one day work as a nurse, mechanic, building designer, videographer, farmer, office assistant, makeup artist and more.

This training is invaluable, as it equips students to enter the work force or college with a skill they will have the rest of their lives.