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A new approach to offense

Though Billy Jackson, Thorsby’s offensive play-caller last season, will focus on the defense as the Rebels first-year head coach, don’t think Jackson doesn’t still realize the importance of scoring points.

With a new coordinator, a more experienced quarterback, plenty of playmakers, a rebuilt offensive line and a new approach to the no-huddle spread attack, Thorsby’s offense could carry this year’s team.
Corey Clements will call the plays and pass them along to junior Andrew Farris, who was one of the county’s leading passers last year despite never having played a down of organized football before the season began.
Farris will have plenty of weapons in junior receivers Marcus Bray and David Roland; running backs Kalup Nunn, a junior, and Dillan Simmons, a senior; and tight ends Eric Camarillo, a junior, and Cole Jackson, a senior.
An offensive line long on age but not experience will have to provide holes to run through and time to throw. Though four projected starters are seniors, only one—Josh Whitman at left guard—returns to the same position he played last year.
Senior Lance Price is also a returning starter but has moved from left tackle to center. None of three other senior starters on the offensive front—Trent Ellison at left tackle and either Cole Langley or Jacob Varden at right tackle—have played varsity football before. Sophomore Jonathan Spivey is the other starter, at right guard.
“We’re just not real experienced,” Jackson said. “I kind of feel like we might start out a little slow out of the gate.
“It’s been hard to tell where we are because we’re going against our scout team every day: Is our line worse than last year or is our defense better?”
Jackson hopes a fresher offense will be a better offense. Most of Thorsby’s stalwarts last season, such as Bray and Camarillo, were full-time starters on offense and defense, which Jackson said hurt the effectiveness of the no-huddle attack the Rebels were trying to run.
This season, look for offensive contributors to focus on that side of the ball and for younger players to fill in the gaps on defense.
“It’s kind of defeating the purpose of running the no-huddle when they’re worn out,” Jackson said. “We’re trying, we hope, to give more people an opportunity this year.”

Though Billy Jackson, Thorsby’s offensive play-caller last season, will focus on the defense as the Rebels first-year head coach, don’t think Jackson doesn’t still realize the importance of scoring points.

With a new coordinator, a more experienced quarterback, plenty of playmakers, a rebuilt offensive line and a new approach to the no-huddle spread attack, Thorsby’s offense could carry this year’s team.

Corey Clements will call the plays and pass them along to junior Andrew Farris, who was one of the county’s leading passers last year despite never having played a down of organized football before the season began.

Farris will have plenty of weapons in junior receivers Marcus Bray and David Roland; running backs Kalup Nunn, a junior, and Dillan Simmons, a senior; and tight ends Eric Camarillo, a junior, and Cole Jackson, a senior.

An offensive line long on age but not experience will have to provide holes to run through and time to throw. Though four projected starters are seniors, only one—Josh Whitman at left guard—returns to the same position he played last year.

Senior Lance Price is also a returning starter but has moved from left tackle to center. None of three other senior starters on the offensive front—Trent Ellison at left tackle and either Cole Langley or Jacob Varden at right tackle—have played varsity football before. Sophomore Jonathan Spivey is the other starter, at right guard.

“We’re just not real experienced,” Jackson said. “I kind of feel like we might start out a little slow out of the gate.

“It’s been hard to tell where we are because we’re going against our scout team every day: Is our line worse than last year or is our defense better?”

Jackson hopes a fresher offense will be a better offense. Most of Thorsby’s stalwarts last season, such as Bray and Camarillo, were full-time starters on offense and defense, which Jackson said hurt the effectiveness of the no-huddle attack the Rebels were trying to run.

This season, look for offensive contributors to focus on that side of the ball and for younger players to fill in the gaps on defense.

“It’s kind of defeating the purpose of running the no-huddle when they’re worn out,” Jackson said. “We’re trying, we hope, to give more people an opportunity this year.”