• 88°

This is enough

Unfortunately, we are once again witnesses to another train wreck, but Sunday’s incident had nothing to do with a train hitting a vehicle at a crossing. This time, a train struck a person who was trespassing on the railroad tracks between crossings.

This is a different scenario from last year’s train crashes, but the end result was the same – another fatality. It is apparent that many of us are tired of reading the morning newspaper about another train crash.

Operation Lifesaver, an organization that is in the business of educating people about practicing safety along railroads, has several tips for pedestrians who must cross railroad tracks.

Cross tracks only at designated pedestrian or roadway crossings. It can take a mile or more to stop a train, so a locomotive engineer who suddenly spots you ahead has little chance to miss you. Railroad property is private property. For your safety, it is illegal to be there unless you are at a designated public crossing.

The only safe place to cross is at a designated public crossing with either a crossbuck, flashing red lights or a gate. If you cross at any other place, you are trespassing and can be ticketed or fined.

Do not cross the tracks immediately after a train passes. A second train might be blocked by the first. Trains can come from either direction. Wait until you can see clearly around the first train in both directions.

Never walk around or behind lowered gates at a crossing.

Do not attempt to hop aboard railroad equipment at any time. A slip of the foot can cost you a limb or your life.

Do not walk, run, cycle or operate all terrain vehicles (ATVs) on railroad tracks or rights-of-way or through tunnels.

Never walk down a train track; it’s illegal and it’s dangerous. By the time a locomotive engineer can see a trespasser or a vehicle on the tracks, it is too late.

We definitely don’t want to see another accident like this. Please be careful, and don’t trespass on the railroad.