JHS senior Scout Glasscock displays her silver earrings and headband she uses to add flair to her white collared shirt.
JHS senior Scout Glasscock displays her silver earrings and headband she uses to add flair to her white collared shirt.

Archived Story

Students display style despite dress code restrictions

Published 4:28pm Friday, August 30, 2013

At Chilton County schools that require students to wear specific types of clothing commonly known as “uniforms,” students still have options as to what colors, accessories and shoes they wear each day.

Two weeks into a new academic year, local students shared ways they spruce up their school outfits and express their individuality while adhering to their dress codes.

Scout Glasscock, a senior at Jemison High School, said this marks her fifth year of following a stricter school dress code.

“I don’t have a problem with it,” Glasscock said. “You don’t have to sit and plan out what you’re going to wear. It’s planned out.”

Glasscock, 17, supplements her solid Polo-style collared shirts with decorative headbands, earrings and shoes.

In addition to making her morning routine easier, Glasscock said the clothes relieve stress associated with how her outfits compare with her classmates’ outfits each day.

“You don’t have to worry about being overdressed or underdressed,” Glasscock said. “It’s a nice change.”

At JHS, the Monday–Thursday dress code requires students to wear collared Polo-style shirts with all but the top button required to be buttoned.

Shirts can be solid navy, white or grey and can be layered as long as undershirts are also in dress code colors. No stripes or patterns are allowed.

Long or short-sleeved Polo-style shirts for males and females are allowed, and females may wear navy or white blouses with a collar.

Shirts must be tucked in unless a medical diagnosis from a doctor prohibits a student from wearing shirts tucked in.

Pants, shorts or skirts in solid khaki or navy with flat or pleated fronts are allowed. They must fit at the student’s natural waistline.

No oversized, baggy or sagging pants are allowed.

Capri pants in dress code colors with flat or pleated fronts are allowed, as well as cargo shorts and shorts or skirts that are at least knee length.

Leggings, jean leggings, stretch and spandex pants are not allowed.

Undershirts must be solid in navy, white or grey.

Belts are required.

Friday dress code at JHS lets students wear JHS logo or T-shirts or a Polo-style, collared shirt in navy, white or grey.

Plain jeans in a denim wash with no holes or frays are permitted.

Navy or khaki shorts and skirts must be at least knee length.

For cold weather, outer clothing such as sweaters, sweatshirts, vests or jackets must be solid navy, white or grey.

Solid navy, white or grey Polo-style shirts must be worn underneath outer clothing with collars showing.

Parents may order jackets for their students through JHS during the school year.

No hoodies are allowed on campus.

David Malpica, a senior at JHS, has also followed these dress code rules for five years.

JHS senior David Malpica adds to his school Polo-style shirt and khaki shorts with wristbands and different shoes.
JHS senior David Malpica adds to his school Polo-style shirt and khaki shorts with wristbands and different shoes.

Like Glasscock, Malpica said he doesn’t mind wearing the clothes and often sports wristbands and different shoes to make his outfit stand out.

“It doesn’t make people look at you differently for what you wear,” Malpica said. “I get ready quick in the morning. It doesn’t take long.”

Both Malpica and Glasscock are members of the JHS Blue Regiment Band, which gives them opportunities to wear different clothing.

As a trumpet player, Malpica can wear his uniform during performances, and Glasscock can wear her majorette costume.

“I remember when I started eighth grade, I hated them, but I think it’s just become a part of life,” Malpica said of his school clothes. “It doesn’t bother me anymore.”

County schools are allowed to choose whether to require their students to wear specific types of clothing in addition to the dress code rules outlined in the Chilton County Code of Conduct for all schools.

Assistant Principal Diane Calloway said she has heard positive feedback from students about the required clothing.

“They just have their basic clothes they wear every day, and they don’t have to worry about it,” Calloway said. “They say it takes a lot of stress out of getting ready for school. I do like the fact that they can individualize with their jewelry, belts and shoes.”

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