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County Commissioner Tim Mims passes after fight with cancer

Published 4:40pm Thursday, November 14, 2013

Maplesville native, former businessman and Chilton County Commissioner Tim Mims died early Thursday morning from a battle with cancer.

Mims, 53, was originally born in Dallas County on June 3, 1960, but spent the majority of his life in Maplesville.

“He loved Maplesville and Maplesville loved him,” Maplesville Town Clerk Sheila Haigler said. “He always had the town of Maplesville and Chilton County’s best interest at heart.”

Many throughout the community shared different memories of Mims on Thursday as they learned the news of his passing, including close friend and Chilton County Commission chairman Allen Caton.

“Tim was one of my best friends,” Caton said. “He was more than a commissioner to me. We have always shared different things going on in our lives and everything that went on we talked about together.”

Caton recalled Mims mentioning to him after the Oct. 14 commission meeting had adjourned that he was going to the doctor the following day for some tests after noticing a few health problems.

“I prayed for Tim right there on the steps outside of the courthouse,” Caton said. “I told him that I loved him and I would do anything in the world for him.”

Caton said the next day he received a call from Mims who told him the doctors had found cancer in several places throughout his body.

“We cried together,” Caton said. “It has just hit me really hard. I got very emotional at the last commission meeting because it all just hit me. I like to think I am a tough person, but I have always thought the world of Tim.”

Mims was first elected to serve on the Chilton County Commission on Nov. 12, 1996, after receiving 12,828 votes, the highest amount of votes for commissioners in that election.

He served on the commission until Nov. 14, 2000, but did not run again for the commission until 2004.

After receiving 13,789 votes in 2004, the highest amount of votes that year for commissioners, Mims was re-elected and served on the commission until his death.

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