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School administrators, teachers should be commended

Published 8:11am Monday, May 13, 2013

Dear editor:

I would like to take this opportunity to thank each and every one who is affiliated with Jemison Elementary School and pay special tribute to their teachers and administrators.

Our family has a student enrolled there. He previously attended another school, and our family was informed that he would have to be held back instead of being promoted to first grade. The family moved to Jemison, and he was subsequently enrolled in that school. Upon starting school, he was tested and then moved up to first grade.

As it turned out, he did actually need some extra help, but the staff at Jemison Elementary was up to the challenge. He has made great strides with the help of Sherie Cleckler, his first grade teacher; Principal Louise Pitts; first grade teacher Rebecca Brown; Arlene Wilson, a teacher who now voluntarily tutors him two hours a week in reading; Regina Young; and speech teacher LeeAnne Jackson.

I thank God for the many concerned teachers who sacrifice time beyond the classroom to ensure that our children succeed in school. These teachers have to endure so very much, not to mention the cost of time and money to earn their education. In many respects, teaching is a thankless job, especially when you have to deal with the public on a daily basis. Even some of our laws make it extremely difficult to be an educator in many instances.

These special people deserve our gratitude and recognition. It warms the heart of parents and grandparents like us who have children in this particular school. They deserve a huge “thank you” for helping to educate the adults of tomorrow. I’m sure they will have earned many crowns in heaven for the valuable work they do.

Jemison Elementary is not a perfect school. As a matter of fact, there are no perfect schools. However, the staff and administration there are pretty close to perfect, in our estimation. If prayer were restored to our schools, then Jemison Elementary would be as close to perfect as you could get.

Dot Easterling and family

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